Family · Gluten Free · Holidays · Humor

Almond Flour ‘Cornbread’…Gluten Free Treat

I love traditional cornbread¬†but for those trying to avoid gluten, it isn’t a fit. Last night I made a big pot of beef stew with cornbread for the family but needed a gluten-free version. The Almond Flour Cornbread is delicious with the slight sweetness of honey. Yummy!

While I was writing this post today my good buddy, Jan, sent me a link to a ‘Today’s Dinner Party‘ that brought a smile to my face, given all of the dietary restrictions we all face.

Enjoy!

ALMOND FLOUR ‘CORNBREAD’

1 1/2 cups almond flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup honey
4 eggs, beaten

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  • Place the flour, baking soda and salt into a bowl and whisk to combine.
  • Add the honey to the beaten eggs and add to flour mixture. Stir until fully combined and no lumps remain.
  • Pour into a well-greased 8×8″ baking pan and bake for 20-25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean.
  • Let cool for 5 minutes.

Recipe from Preppy Paleo and Angel’s Homestead

Family · Family Favorites · Gluten Free · New Traditions

Peach Blueberry Crumble

Peaches are in season and I love a peach dessert.  I adapted a recipe from Barefoot Contessa to be gluten-free. It was delicious. The rice flour is lighter, therefore, you need to add about 25% more rice flour that the all-purpose flour called for in a recipe.  I’ve shown the rice flour and the all-purpose flour proportions in the recipe below. I also sprinkled sugar on top of the crumble to give it a little extra sweetness.

 

The Crumble served warm with good vanilla ice cream…it’s what I wish I were having for dessert tonight!

PEACH AND BLUEBERRY CRUMBLE

GF=Gluten-Free

2 pounds firm, ripe peaches (6 to 8 peaches)
2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/2 cup granulated sugar
3/8 cup rice flour (GF) OR 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (non GF)
1 cup fresh blueberries

Crumble:

1.25 cups rice flour (GF) OR 1 cup all-purpose flour (non GF)
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 pound (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, diced

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  • Immerse the peaches in boiling water for 30 seconds to 1 minute, until their skins peel off easily. Place them immediately in cold water. Peel the peaches, slice them into thick wedges, and place them in a large bowl. Add the lemon zest, lemon juice, granulated sugar, and flour. Toss well. Gently mix in the blueberries. Allow the mixture to sit for 5 minutes. Spoon the mixture into buttered ramekins or baking dish.

  • For the topping, combine the flour, granulated sugar, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low speed until the butter is the size of peas. Rub the mixture with your fingertips until it’s in big crumbles, then sprinkle evenly over the fruit.
  • Place the ramekins on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper and bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until the top is browned and crisp and the juices are bubbly. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Recipe Adapted From Food Network, 2006 Barefoot Contessa

Gluten Free · Rheumatoid Arthritis

First Awareness Day for Rheumatoid Disease February 2 … food for thought!

February 2 is Ground Hog Day and, this year, the first Awareness Day for Rheumatoid Disease.  I love the comparison of the Ground Hog seeing his shadow to first diagnosis of the disease and trying to predict how the course of the disease will run for each individual.  I am so happy to see this debilitating disease finally getting increased national awareness.

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People often think of Rheumatoid Disease as ‘just arthritis’.  Rheumatoid Disease is an autoimmune disorder that attacks joint and organ tissue.  It manifests itself differently in each patient, young and old.

The Summer of 2008 I was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis.  My early symptoms included annoying nodules on my elbows and crippling hand pain. The nodules had been a problem for years and my Dermatologist treated them with cortisone injections (interestingly if she injected in one arm, they just jumped over to the other arm).

It wasn’t until I made an appointment with my Physician Assistant and related the hand pain and nodules, that the diagnosis process began.  She took a biopsy of one nodule and ran a panel of blood tests.  All results pointed to Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and I was quickly referred to a Rheumatologist.

The first two years of treatment involved injections (Enbrel) and Celebrex and when a flare-up occurred, steroids came into play.  During this time, I also started seeing an Accupuncturist who treated my immune system and I began practicing yoga. Additional doses of Fish Oil, B12 and Vitamin D were added to my daily regimen.  I also began to realize the correlation between gluten and inflammation.

Flare-ups typically occurred during periods of high stress.  Solution…less stress.  In late 2010 I had the opportunity to retire early from my corporate management position.  Amazingly, once I knew I was leaving, the stress began to dissipate.  I discontinued taking Enbrel and Celebrex and my RA has been in remission for two years.

I’m lucky and grateful that, for today, I have my health.  Rheumatoid Arthritis is considered a genetic disease yet the only possible connection in our family is to a third cousin.  However, shortly after I was diagnosed, my niece, seven years my junior, was also diagnosed with Rheumatoid Disease.

Raise your awareness and voice on February 2 for Rheumatoid Disease.  I know I will.

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http://rawarrior.com/first-awareness-day-for-rheumatoid-arthritis-established-by-rheumatoid-patient-foundation/#.UQAhXkxhGd0.facebook

http://rheum4us.org/

http://www.arthritis.org/